Bryan Adams apologizes after blaming the coronavirus pandemic on ‘Bat eating b*****ds’

Bryan Adams shared a perfunctory apology on Tuesday for inflammatory comments he made the day before about the coronavirus pandemic.

‘Apologies to any and all that took offence to my posting yesterday,’ he wrote in a follow-up post on Instagram.

The 60-year-old Summer Of ’69 singer previously blamed the pandemic on ‘bat eating b*****ds’ in a post that was widely condemned as racist on social media.

Taking it back: Bryan Adams, 60, issued a perfunctory apology to Instagram on Tuesday after blaming the coronavirus pandemic on ‘bat eating b*****ds,’ which many labeled racist

‘Apologies to any and all that took offence to my posting yesterday. No excuse, I just wanted to have a rant about the horrible animal cruelty in these wet-markets being the possible source of the virus, and promote veganism,’ he wrote.

‘I have love for all people and my thoughts are with everyone dealing with this pandemic around the world. Here’s the appropriately titled song that would have been performed tonight at the @royalalberthall.’

Like his initial post, Adams included a snippet of himself performing one of his songs from a now-canceled concert at London’s Royal Albert Hall, giving the post more than whiff of self-promotion. 

Many social media users interpreted his original post as an attack on Chinese people. It came amid new reports of anti-Asian racism and an increase in derogatory terms referring to Asians online, according to CNN

'No excuse': 'Apologies to any and all that took offence to my posting yesterday. No excuse, I just wanted to have a rant about the horrible animal cruelty in these wet-markets being the possible source of the virus, and promote veganism,' he wrote

‘No excuse’: ‘Apologies to any and all that took offence to my posting yesterday. No excuse, I just wanted to have a rant about the horrible animal cruelty in these wet-markets being the possible source of the virus, and promote veganism,’ he wrote

Self-promotion: Like his first post, the singer shared the apology with a solo acoustic performance of one of his songs he would have played at a canceled performance in London; shown in 2018

Self-promotion: Like his first post, the singer shared the apology with a solo acoustic performance of one of his songs he would have played at a canceled performance in London; shown in 2018

Eye opening:  Adams was branded 'racist' over a shocking social media post which appeared to blame the ongoing coronavirus pandemic on China and its citizens

Eye opening:  Adams was branded ‘racist’ over a shocking social media post which appeared to blame the ongoing coronavirus pandemic on China and its citizens

Adams’ original profanity-laced post was focused on the existence of animal wet markets.

‘Tonight was supposed to be the beginning of a tenancy of gigs at the @royalalberthall, but thanks to some f****ing bat eating, wet market animal selling, virus making greedy b*******, the whole world is now on hold, not to mention the thousands that have suffered or died from this virus. ‘

The hitmaker seemed to blame the people of Wuhan, China, where the virus is believed to have originated, for eating meat and selling live animals.

‘My message to them other than “thanks a f***ing lot” is go vegan,’ he added.

Adams ended the post with more mundane apologies to fans and calls to ‘take care of yourselves.’

He also added the hashtags ‘#banwetmarkets’ and ‘#govegan.’

Though he apologized, Adams didn’t remove the offending post and merely disabled comments on it. 

Shocking: The rocker came under fire for the post - shared on Instagram and Twitter- in which he blamed the pandemic on 'bat eating b*****ds' (pictured in 2015)

Shocking: The rocker came under fire for the post – shared on Instagram and Twitter- in which he blamed the pandemic on ‘bat eating b*****ds’ (pictured in 2015)

Wet markets are any marketplaces selling produce, fish and meat, and not all wet markets sell live animals.

The Summer of ’69 hitmaker was widely lambasted on Twitter for the post, which many users considered racist.   

Adams’ Instagram post began innocuously enough with a solo acoustic snippet of his popular song Cuts Like A Knife, but the post quickly devolved into finger-pointing about the pandemic’s origins. 

The response to his post was swift, and multiple users called him out for the racist comments.

Singled out: The hitmaker seemed to blame denizens of Wuhan, China, where the virus is believed to have originated, for eating meat and selling live animals; shown in 2017

Singled out: The hitmaker seemed to blame denizens of Wuhan, China, where the virus is believed to have originated, for eating meat and selling live animals; shown in 2017

‘Man we were killin’ time / We were young and racist / We needed to unwind,’ wrote the Los Angeles Times’ Chief Film Critic Justin Chang, who paraphrased lyrics from Summer Of ’69.

Another user was also inspired by Adams’ hit.

‘BRYAN ADAMS: wrote my first real racist tweet / my career was already in decline / blaming the Chinese for my lack of income / was the summer of COVID one-nine,’ they wrote.

Another Twitter user shared a funny photo of Baby Yoda from The Mandalorian gaping in shock. 

Punny: Justin Chang, Chief Film Critic for the Los Angeles Times, called the song racist by paraphrasing the lyrics to Adams' Summer Of '69

Punny: Justin Chang, Chief Film Critic for the Los Angeles Times, called the song racist by paraphrasing the lyrics to Adams’ Summer Of ’69

Great minds: Another user was also inspired by the enduring staple of classic rock radio

Great minds: Another user was also inspired by the enduring staple of classic rock radio

 

Fury: #BryanAdamsIsCancelled began trending worldwide as fans blasted the Canadian singer

Fury: #BryanAdamsIsCancelled began trending worldwide as fans blasted the Canadian singer

‘Me: Cool, Bryan Adams is trending number 1 in the world! Me: See’s why Bryan Adams is trending,’ they wrote above the shocked expression.

Another take followed a similar format.

‘*Sees Bryan Adams is trending: huh I wonder if he’s doing some sort of #Covid19 benefit or something,’ they wrote, adding a gif of Steve Carell as Michael Scott from The Office saying, ‘Nope. Don’t like that.’

Writer Rax King tweeted: ‘Anybody have ‘bryan adams racist meltdown’ in the 2020-is-a-hot-mess pool.’

One user replied directly to Adams’ post with more fury than humor: ‘So what you’re saying, if I understand correctly, is that all of this has really inconvenienced Bryan Adams? 

'Nope. Don't like that': A gif of Steve Carell as Michael Scott from The Office represented another user's surprise

‘Nope. Don’t like that’: A gif of Steve Carell as Michael Scott from The Office represented another user’s surprise

Didn't see that coming: Writer Rax King didn't see the post in her '2020-is-a-hot-mess pool'

Didn’t see that coming: Writer Rax King didn’t see the post in her ‘2020-is-a-hot-mess pool’

'Inconvenienced': shne user replied directly to Adams' post with more fury than humor

‘Inconvenienced’: One user replied directly to Adams’ post with more fury than humor

Apt comparison: Another Twitter poster compared Adams to another rocker who was at his most popular in the 1980s

Apt comparison: Another Twitter poster compared Adams to another rocker who was at his most popular in the 1980s

‘Well, I’m sure all the sick and and dying common folks around the world will sympathise with you, for your loss. The struggle is real. For Bryan Adams,’ they wrote.

Another Twitter poster compared Adams to another rocker who was at his most popular in the 1980s.

‘So Twitter this past seven days has taught us two music-related lessons: 1) Axl Rose isn’t as big an a****** as we thought. 2) Bryan Adams is an even larger a****** than we ever imagined.’ 

Ryan has been an outspoken advocate for veganism. 

In an interview with People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), he described how his love of his dogs led him to adopt a vegan diet, which excludes all meat, as well as animal byproducts including eggs and dairy.

The organization has been criticized in the past for its anti-fur advertisements featuring partially covered nude women, which some detractors have found to be sexist. 

Nothing to see here: So far, Adams has yet to comment on the controversy, though he previously spoke with People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals about his journey to adopting a vegan diet (pictured in 2018)

Nothing to see here: So far, Adams has yet to comment on the controversy, though he previously spoke with People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals about his journey to adopting a vegan diet (pictured in 2018)